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Molecular dialogue between the human gut microbiota and the host: a Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 X users
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
261 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
376 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular dialogue between the human gut microbiota and the host: a Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium perspective
Published in
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, March 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00018-013-1318-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Turroni, Marco Ventura, Ludovica F. Buttó, Sabrina Duranti, Paul W. O’Toole, Mary O’Connell Motherway, Douwe van Sinderen

Abstract

The human gut represents a highly complex ecosystem, which is densely colonized by a myriad of microorganisms that influence the physiology, immune function and health status of the host. Among the many members of the human gut microbiota, there are microorganisms that have co-evolved with their host and that are believed to exert health-promoting or probiotic effects. Probiotic bacteria isolated from the gut and other environments are commercially exploited, and although there is a growing list of health benefits provided by the consumption of such probiotics, their precise mechanisms of action have essentially remained elusive. Genomics approaches have provided exciting new opportunities for the identification of probiotic effector molecules that elicit specific responses to influence the physiology and immune function of their human host. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the intriguing relationships that exist between the human gut and key members of the gut microbiota such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, discussed here as prototypical groups of probiotic microorganisms.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 376 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Japan 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 360 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 69 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 67 18%
Researcher 52 14%
Student > Bachelor 37 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 4%
Other 51 14%
Unknown 84 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 103 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 36 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 3%
Other 46 12%
Unknown 100 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2020.
All research outputs
#1,393,623
of 25,654,806 outputs
Outputs from Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences
#125
of 5,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,529
of 211,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences
#1
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,654,806 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,220 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.