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Radio‐guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer—a prospective clinical study

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Urology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
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Title
Radio‐guided sentinel lymph node detection and lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer—a prospective clinical study
Published in
British Journal of Urology, October 2016
DOI 10.1111/bju.13700
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aljabery, F., Shabo, I., Olson, Hans, Gimm, Oliver, Jahnson, Staffan, Aljabery, Firas, Shabo, Ivan, Olsson, Hans, Firas Aljabery, Ivan Shabo, Hans Olsson, Oliver Gimm, Staffan Jahnson

Abstract

We investigated the possibility to detect sentinel nodes in patients with urinary bladder cancer (UBC) intra-operatively and whether the histopathological status of the identified sentinel nodes reflected that of the lymphatic field. We studied 103 patients with UBC pathological stage T1-T4 who were treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node (LN) dissection during 2005-2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. Radioactive tracer Nanocoll 70 MBq (megabequerel) and blue dye were injected in the bladder wall around the primary tumour prior to surgery. Sentinel nodes were detected ex vivo during the operation with a hand-hold Geiger probe (Neoprobe Gamma Detection System). All lymph nodes were formalin-fixed, sectioned three times, mounted on slides and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. An experienced uropathologist (HO) evaluated the slides. The mean age of the patients was 69 years, and 80 (77%) were male. Pathological staging was T1-12 (12%), T2-20 (19%), T3-48 (47%) and T4-23 (22%). A mean number of 31 nodes per patient were examined (range 7-68), totaling 3,253 nodes. LN metastases were found in 41 (40%) patients. Sentinel nodes were detected in 80% (83 of 103) of the patients. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SNB varied between LN stations with an average value of 67% and 90%, respectively. Lymph node metastatic density had a significant prognostic impact; a value of 8% or more was significantly related to shorter survival. Lympho-vascular invasion occurred in 65% (n=67) of patients and was significantly associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (p<0.001). Sentinel node biopsy is not a reliable technique for per-operative localization of lymph node metastases during cystectomy for UBC. However, lymph-node metastatic density has a significant prognostic value in UBC and may be useful in the clinical context and in UBC oncologic and surgical research. Lympho-vascular invasion is a prognostic factor. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 40%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 60%
Unspecified 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2018.
All research outputs
#1,197,616
of 11,877,920 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Urology
#403
of 3,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,680
of 256,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Urology
#7
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,877,920 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,883 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.