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Gender inequality and violence against women in Spain, 2006-2014: towards a civilized society

Overview of attention for article published in Gaceta Sanitaria, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
144 Mendeley
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Title
Gender inequality and violence against women in Spain, 2006-2014: towards a civilized society
Published in
Gaceta Sanitaria, March 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.gaceta.2016.07.025
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erika M. Redding, María Teresa Ruiz-Cantero, José Fernández-Sáez, Marta Guijarro-Garvi

Abstract

Considering both the economic crisis of 2008 and the Gender Equality Law (2007), this study analyses the association between gender inequality in Spanish Autonomous Communities (AC) and intimate partner violence (IPV) from 2006 to 2014 in terms of socio-demographic characteristics. Ecological study in the 17 Spanish AC on the correlation between the reported cases by IPV and deaths and the Gender Inequality Index and its dimensions: empowerment, participation in the labour market and adolescent birth rates; and their correlation with Young People Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET). In 2006, IPV mortality rates were higher in autonomous communities with greater gender inequality than AC with more equality (4.1 vs. 2.5×10(6) women >14 years), as were reporting rates of IPV (OR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.47-1.50). In 2014, the IPV mortality rates in AC with greater gender inequality fell to just below the mortality rates in AC with more gender equality (2.5 vs. 2.7×10(6) women >14 years). Rates of IPV reports also decreased (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.20-1.23). Adolescent birth rates were most associated with IPV reports, which were also associated with the burden of NEET by AC (ρ2006=0.494, ρ2014=0.615). Gender-sensitive policies may serve as a platform for reduced mortality and reports of IPV in Spain, particularly in AC with more gender inequality. A reduction of NEET may reduce adolescent birth rates and in turn IPV rates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 144 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 31 22%
Student > Master 17 12%
Researcher 10 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 40 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 28 19%
Psychology 18 13%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 3%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 43 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,438,506
of 15,335,714 outputs
Outputs from Gaceta Sanitaria
#351
of 731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,595
of 293,444 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gaceta Sanitaria
#11
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,335,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 731 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,444 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.