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Estuary-ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, November 2016
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3 tweeters

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92 Mendeley
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Title
Estuary-ocean connectivity: fast physics, slow biology
Published in
Global Change Biology, November 2016
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13546
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mélanie Raimonet, James E. Cloern

Abstract

Estuaries are connected to both land and ocean so their physical, chemical and biological dynamics are influenced by climate patterns over watersheds and ocean basins. We explored climate-driven oceanic variability as a source of estuarine variability by comparing monthly time series of temperature and chlorophyll-a inside San Francisco Bay with those in adjacent shelf waters of the California Current System (CCS) that are strongly responsive to wind-driven upwelling. Monthly temperature fluctuations inside and outside the Bay were synchronous, but their correlations weakened with distance from the ocean. These results illustrate how variability of coastal water temperature (and associated properties such as nitrate and oxygen) propagates into estuaries through fast water exchanges that dissipate along the estuary. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between monthly chlorophyll-a variability inside and outside the Bay. However, at the annual scale Bay chlorophyll-a was significantly correlated with the Spring Transition Index (STI) that sets biological production supporting fish recruitment in the CCS. Wind forcing of the CCS shifted in the late 1990s when the STI advanced 40 days. This shift was followed, with lags of 1-3 years, by 3-19 fold increased abundances of 5 ocean-produced demersal fish and crustaceans and 2.5-fold increase of summer chlorophyll-a in the Bay. These changes reflect a slow biological process of estuary-ocean connectivity operating through the immigration of fish and crustaceans that prey on bivalves, reduce their grazing pressure and allow phytoplankton biomass to build. We identified clear signals of climate-mediated oceanic variability in this estuary, and discovered that the response patterns vary with the process of connectivity and the time scale of ocean variability. This result has important implications for managing nutrient inputs to estuaries connected to upwelling systems, and for assessing their responses to changing patterns of upwelling timing and intensity as the planet continues to warm. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 91 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Researcher 17 18%
Student > Master 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Professor 5 5%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 17 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 29%
Environmental Science 22 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 22 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2016.
All research outputs
#8,369,502
of 13,353,516 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#3,124
of 3,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,587
of 287,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#70
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,353,516 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,629 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,243 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.