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Bifidobacterium longum 1714 as a translational psychobiotic: modulation of stress, electrophysiology and neurocognition in healthy volunteers

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Psychiatry, November 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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Title
Bifidobacterium longum 1714 as a translational psychobiotic: modulation of stress, electrophysiology and neurocognition in healthy volunteers
Published in
Translational Psychiatry, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/tp.2016.191
Pubmed ID
Authors

A P Allen, W Hutch, Y E Borre, P J Kennedy, A Temko, G Boylan, E Murphy, J F Cryan, T G Dinan, G Clarke

Abstract

The emerging concept of psychobiotics-live microorganisms with a potential mental health benefit-represents a novel approach for the management of stress-related conditions. The majority of studies have focused on animal models. Recent preclinical studies have identified the B. longum 1714 strain as a putative psychobiotic with an impact on stress-related behaviors, physiology and cognitive performance. Whether such preclinical effects could be translated to healthy human volunteers remains unknown. We tested whether psychobiotic consumption could affect the stress response, cognition and brain activity patterns. In a within-participants design, healthy volunteers (N=22) completed cognitive assessments, resting electroencephalography and were exposed to a socially evaluated cold pressor test at baseline, post-placebo and post-psychobiotic. Increases in cortisol output and subjective anxiety in response to the socially evaluated cold pressor test were attenuated. Furthermore, daily reported stress was reduced by psychobiotic consumption. We also observed subtle improvements in hippocampus-dependent visuospatial memory performance, as well as enhanced frontal midline electroencephalographic mobility following psychobiotic consumption. These subtle but clear benefits are in line with the predicted impact from preclinical screening platforms. Our results indicate that consumption of B. longum 1714 is associated with reduced stress and improved memory. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the benefits of this putative psychobiotic in relevant stress-related conditions and to unravel the mechanisms underlying such effects.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 540 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 539 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 97 18%
Student > Master 94 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 11%
Researcher 61 11%
Other 26 5%
Other 66 12%
Unknown 134 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 76 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 9%
Neuroscience 45 8%
Psychology 40 7%
Other 107 20%
Unknown 169 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 173. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2022.
All research outputs
#186,826
of 22,381,487 outputs
Outputs from Translational Psychiatry
#88
of 3,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,515
of 317,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Psychiatry
#2
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,381,487 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,718 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.