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Limits of social mobilization

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
135 Mendeley
Title
Limits of social mobilization
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1216338110
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Rutherford, M. Cebrian, S. Dsouza, E. Moro, A. Pentland, I. Rahwan

Abstract

The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 6%
Germany 3 2%
Brazil 3 2%
Netherlands 2 1%
Japan 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 109 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 25%
Researcher 30 22%
Student > Master 21 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 8%
Professor 7 5%
Other 32 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 37 27%
Social Sciences 21 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 7%
Physics and Astronomy 9 7%
Psychology 8 6%
Other 50 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 56. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2019.
All research outputs
#269,409
of 12,535,586 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6,126
of 77,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,954
of 145,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#92
of 1,008 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,535,586 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,989 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,008 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.