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Nutrition support to patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, December 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Nutrition support to patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery
Published in
Nutrition Journal, December 2003
DOI 10.1186/1475-2891-2-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Ward

Abstract

Nutritional depletion has been demonstrated to be a major determinant of the development of post-operative complications. Gastrointestinal surgery patients are at risk of nutritional depletion from inadequate nutritional intake, surgical stress and the subsequent increase in metabolic rate. Fears of postoperative ileus and the integrity of the newly constructed anastomosis have led to treatment typically entailing starvation with administration of intravenous fluids until the passage of flatus. However, it has since been shown that prompt postoperative enteral feeding is both effective and well tolerated. Enteral feeding is also associated with specific clinical benefits such as reduced incidence of postoperative infectious complications and an improved wound healing response. Further research is required to determine whether enteral nutrition is also associated with modulation of gut function. Studies have indicated that significant reductions in morbidity and mortality associated with perioperative Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) are limited to severely malnourished patients with gastrointestinal malignancy. Meta-analyses have shown that enteral nutrition is associated with fewer septic complications compared with parenteral feeding, reduced costs and a shorter hospital stay, so should be the preferred option whenever possible. Evidence to support pre-operative nutrition support is limited, but suggests that if malnourished individuals are adequately fed for at least 7-10 days preoperatively then surgical outcome can be improved. Ongoing research continues to explore the potential benefits of the action of glutamine on the gut and immune system for gastrointestinal surgery patients. To date it has been demonstrated that glutamine-enriched parenteral nutrition results in reduced length of stay and reduced costs in elective abdominal surgery patients. Further research is required to determine whether the routine supplementation of glutamine is warranted. A limitation for targeted nutritional support is the lack of a standardised, validated definition of nutritional depletion. This would enable nutrition support to be more readily targeted to those surgical patients most likely to derive significant clinical benefit in terms of improved post-operative outcome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Mali 1 2%
Unknown 53 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 13 23%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2019.
All research outputs
#431,402
of 15,404,988 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#150
of 1,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,027
of 154,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,404,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 154,388 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them