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Access to hepatitis C medicines

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
Access to hepatitis C medicines
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, October 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.15.157784
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danny J Edwards, Delphi GM Coppens, Tara L Prasad, Laurien A Rook, Jayasree K Iyer

Abstract

Hepatitis C is a global epidemic. Worldwide, 185 million people are estimated to be infected, most of whom live in low- and middle-income countries. Recent advances in the development of antiviral drugs have produced therapies that are more effective, safer and better tolerated than existing treatments for the disease. These therapies present an opportunity to curb the epidemic, provided that they are affordable, that generic production of these medicines is scaled up and that awareness and screening programmes are strengthened. Pharmaceutical companies have a central role to play. We examined the marketed products, pipelines and access to medicine strategies of 20 of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies. Six of these companies are developing medicines for hepatitis C: AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & Co. and Roche. These companies employ a range of approaches to supporting hepatitis C treatment, including pricing strategies, voluntary licensing, capacity building and drug donations. We give an overview of the engagement of these companies in addressing access to hepatitis C products. We suggest actions companies can take to play a greater role in curbing this epidemic: (i) prioritizing affordability assessments; (ii) developing access strategies early in the product lifecycle; and (iii) licensing to manufacturers of generic medicines.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 30%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 14%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 10 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2021.
All research outputs
#3,937,723
of 19,476,606 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,278
of 4,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,260
of 311,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#20
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,476,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,409 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.