↓ Skip to main content

Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, April 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1219361110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian S. Mautz, Bob B. M. Wong, Richard A. Peters, Michael D. Jennions, Mautz BS, Wong BB, Peters RA, Jennions MD, B. S. Mautz, B. B. M. Wong, R. A. Peters, M. D. Jennions

Abstract

Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male's relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. Here we show, based upon female assessment of digitally projected life-size, computer-generated images, that penis size interacts with body shape and height to determine male sexual attractiveness. Positive linear selection was detected for penis size, but the marginal increase in attractiveness eventually declined with greater penis size (i.e., quadratic selection). Penis size had a stronger effect on attractiveness in taller men than in shorter men. There was a similar increase in the positive effect of penis size on attractiveness with a more masculine body shape (i.e., greater shoulder-to-hip ratio). Surprisingly, larger penis size and greater height had almost equivalent positive effects on male attractiveness. Our results support the hypothesis that female mate choice could have driven the evolution of larger penises in humans. More broadly, our results show that precopulatory sexual selection can play a role in the evolution of genital traits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 549 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
New Zealand 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 24%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Master 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 12%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 50%
Psychology 4 12%
Unspecified 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 6%
Other 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 987. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,062
of 8,658,756 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#78
of 47,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26
of 119,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2
of 958 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,658,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 47,639 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 119,857 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 958 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.