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DachsLife 2015: an investigation of lifestyle associations with the risk of intervertebral disc disease in Dachshunds

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, November 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
DachsLife 2015: an investigation of lifestyle associations with the risk of intervertebral disc disease in Dachshunds
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40575-016-0039-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. M. A. Packer, I. J. Seath, D. G. O’Neill, S. De Decker, H. A. Volk

Abstract

Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) represents a major problem in the Dachshund, with at a relative risk of IVDD 10-12 times higher than other breeds, and an estimated 19-24 % of Dachshunds showing clinical signs related to IVDD during their lifetime. A variety of genetic, physical and lifestyle-related risk factors for IVDD have previously been identified, with some conflicting findings. As such, advising owners and breeders regarding best-practice for IVDD prevention is challenging at present. This study aimed to (i) estimate prevalence of IVDD in six Dachshund varieties, and (ii) identify risk factors associated with IVDD diagnosis from a wide variety of demographic, conformational, dietary, activity and exercise-related variables. A web-based survey "Dachs-Life 2015" was carried out from January-April 2015, with responses received for 2031 individual Dachshunds. Three-hundred and ten dogs were classed as Cases based on veterinary-diagnosis of IVDD, and 56 dogs were excluded from further analyses due to a lack of veterinary-diagnosis of their clinical signs. The remaining1665 dogs with no previous signs of IVDD were classified as Non-Cases. The overall prevalence of IVDD was 15.7 % (95 % CI: 14.1-17.3). Breed variety was significantly associated with IVDD risk, with the highest prevalence seen in the Standard Smooth-Haired (24.4 %, 95 % CI: 22.5-26.3) and lowest in the Standard Wire-Haired (7.1 %, 95 % CI: 6.0-8.2). Older dogs and neutered dogs were at increased odds of IVDD. Of the lifestyle risk factors, univariable analysis identified dogs that exercised for <30 min per day, were not allowed to jump on and off furniture, or were supplemented with glucosamine or chondroitin were at increased odds of IVDD, whereas dogs that exercised for more than 1 h per day, that were considered highly or moderately active by their owners, and those that showed at Open or Championship shows were at decreased odds of IVDD. In line with previous reports, IVDD is commonly diagnosed in the Dachshund, with significant differences in prevalence between Dachshund varieties. Lifestyle risk factors were identified which are hypothesis-generating for future prospective studies, and can inform an evidence-based approach to mitigating IVDD risk for Dachshund owners and breeders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 29%
Other 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 3%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 19 61%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,512,123
of 14,083,757 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#32
of 74 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,505
of 285,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#4
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,083,757 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,830 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.