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Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
80 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
77 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
260 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1605365113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna C. Carey, Jianwu Tang, Pamela H. Templer, Kevin D. Kroeger, Thomas W. Crowther, Andrew J. Burton, Jeffrey S. Dukes, Bridget Emmett, Serita D. Frey, Mary A. Heskel, Lifen Jiang, Megan B. Machmuller, Jacqueline Mohan, Anne Marie Panetta, Peter B. Reich, Sabine Reinsch, Xin Wang, Steven D. Allison, Chris Bamminger, Scott Bridgham, Scott L. Collins, Giovanbattista de Dato, William C. Eddy, Brian J. Enquist, Marc Estiarte, John Harte, Amanda Henderson, Bart R. Johnson, Klaus Steenberg Larsen, Yiqi Luo, Sven Marhan, Jerry M. Melillo, Josep Peñuelas, Laurel Pfeifer-Meister, Christian Poll, Edward Rastetter, Andrew B. Reinmann, Lorien L. Reynolds, Inger K. Schmidt, Gaius R. Shaver, Aaron L. Strong, Vidya Suseela, Albert Tietema

Abstract

The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 80 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 260 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Canada 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 247 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 75 29%
Researcher 63 24%
Student > Master 27 10%
Unspecified 25 10%
Professor 18 7%
Other 52 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 85 33%
Environmental Science 82 32%
Unspecified 42 16%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 35 13%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 12 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 134. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2017.
All research outputs
#103,285
of 12,979,723 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2,479
of 79,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,099
of 282,184 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#91
of 1,010 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,979,723 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,112 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,184 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,010 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.