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Food web topology and parasites in the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, May 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
107 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
226 Mendeley
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Title
Food web topology and parasites in the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, May 2009
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2008.01518.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Per-Arne Amundsen, Kevin D. Lafferty, Rune Knudsen, Raul Primicerio, Anders Klemetsen, Armand M. Kuris

Abstract

1. Parasites permeate trophic webs with their often complex life cycles, but few studies have included parasitism in food web analyses. Here we provide a highly resolved food web from the pelagic zone of a subarctic lake and explore how the incorporation of parasites alters the topology of the web. 2. Parasites used hosts at all trophic levels and increased both food-chain lengths and the total number of trophic levels. Their inclusion in the network analyses more than doubled the number of links and resulted in an increase in important food-web characteristics such as linkage density and connectance. 3. More than half of the parasite taxa were trophically transmitted, exploiting hosts at multiple trophic levels and thus increasing the degree of omnivory in the trophic web. 4. For trophically transmitted parasites, the number of parasite-host links exhibited a positive correlation with the linkage density of the host species, whereas no such relationship was seen for nontrophically transmitted parasites. Our findings suggest that the linkage density of free-living species affects their exposure to trophically transmitted parasites, which may be more likely to adopt highly connected species as hosts during the evolution of complex life cycles. 5. The study supports a prominent role for parasites in ecological networks and demonstrates that their incorporation may substantially alter considerations of food-web structure and functioning.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 226 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
Brazil 4 2%
France 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Papua New Guinea 1 <1%
Other 12 5%
Unknown 191 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 60 27%
Researcher 51 23%
Student > Master 31 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 6%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 12 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 145 64%
Environmental Science 40 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 2%
Other 9 4%
Unknown 17 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,912,581
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#681
of 2,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,209
of 161,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#14
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,551 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.