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Population exposure to hazardous air quality due to the 2015 fires in Equatorial Asia

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
28 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
179 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
212 Mendeley
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Title
Population exposure to hazardous air quality due to the 2015 fires in Equatorial Asia
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep37074
Pubmed ID
Authors

P. Crippa, S. Castruccio, S. Archer-Nicholls, G. B. Lebron, M. Kuwata, A. Thota, S. Sumin, E. Butt, C. Wiedinmyer, D. V. Spracklen

Abstract

Vegetation and peatland fires cause poor air quality and thousands of premature deaths across densely populated regions in Equatorial Asia. Strong El-Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions are associated with an increase in the frequency and intensity of wildfires in Indonesia and Borneo, enhancing population exposure to hazardous concentrations of smoke and air pollutants. Here we investigate the impact on air quality and population exposure of wildfires in Equatorial Asia during Fall 2015, which were the largest over the past two decades. We performed high-resolution simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry based on a new fire emission product. The model captures the spatio-temporal variability of extreme pollution episodes relative to space- and ground-based observations and allows for identification of pollution sources and transport over Equatorial Asia. We calculate that high particulate matter concentrations from fires during Fall 2015 were responsible for persistent exposure of 69 million people to unhealthy air quality conditions. Short-term exposure to this pollution may have caused 11,880 (6,153-17,270) excess mortalities. Results from this research provide decision-relevant information to policy makers regarding the impact of land use changes and human driven deforestation on fire frequency and population exposure to degraded air quality.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 212 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 212 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 17%
Researcher 31 15%
Student > Master 25 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Other 12 6%
Other 32 15%
Unknown 59 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 55 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 25 12%
Engineering 13 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 4%
Other 34 16%
Unknown 67 32%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 99. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2019.
All research outputs
#439,586
of 25,911,277 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#4,841
of 143,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,706
of 289,964 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#130
of 3,384 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,911,277 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 143,849 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,964 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,384 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.