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Effects of Divergent Selection for Fear of Humans on Behaviour in Red Junglefowl

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

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7 tweeters

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7 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of Divergent Selection for Fear of Humans on Behaviour in Red Junglefowl
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0166075
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beatrix Agnvall, Per Jensen, Sergio Pellis

Abstract

Domestication has caused a range of similar phenotypic changes across taxa, relating to physiology, morphology and behaviour. It has been suggested that this recurring domesticated phenotype may be a result of correlated responses to a central trait, namely increased tameness. We selected Red Junglefowl, the ancestors of domesticated chickens, during five generations for reduced fear of humans. This caused a marked and significant response in tameness, and previous studies have found correlated effects on growth, metabolism, reproduction, and some behaviour not directly selected for. Here, we report the results from a series of behavioural tests carried out on the initial parental generation (P0) and the fifth selected generation (S5), focusing on behaviour not functionally related to tameness, in order to study any correlated effects. Birds were tested for fear of humans, social reinstatement tendency, open field behaviour at two different ages, foraging/exploration, response to a simulated aerial predator attack and tonic immobility. In S5, there were no effects of selection on foraging/exploration or tonic immobility, while in the social reinstatement and open field tests there were significant interactions between selection and sex. In the aerial predator test, there were significant main effects of selection, indicating that fear of humans may represent a general wariness towards predators. In conclusion, we found only small correlated effects on behaviours not related to the tameness trait selected for, in spite of them showing high genetic correlations to fear of humans in a previous study on the same population. This suggests that species-specific behaviour is generally resilient to changes during domestication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Researcher 2 29%
Professor 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 57%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 14%
Psychology 1 14%
Social Sciences 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2017.
All research outputs
#3,366,051
of 8,430,317 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#42,630
of 116,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,700
of 283,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,608
of 4,598 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,430,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 116,193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,341 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,598 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.