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TET-dependent regulation of retrotransposable elements in mouse embryonic stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
30 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
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Title
TET-dependent regulation of retrotransposable elements in mouse embryonic stem cells
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13059-016-1096-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lorenzo de la Rica, Özgen Deniz, Kevin C. L. Cheng, Christopher D. Todd, Cristina Cruz, Jonathan Houseley, Miguel R. Branco

Abstract

Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidise DNA methylation as part of an active demethylation pathway. Despite extensive research into the role of TETs in genome regulation, little is known about their effect on transposable elements (TEs), which make up nearly half of the mouse and human genomes. Epigenetic mechanisms controlling TEs have the potential to affect their mobility and to drive the co-adoption of TEs for the benefit of the host. We performed a detailed investigation of the role of TET enzymes in the regulation of TEs in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We find that TET1 and TET2 bind multiple TE classes that harbour a variety of epigenetic signatures indicative of different functional roles. TETs co-bind with pluripotency factors to enhancer-like TEs that interact with highly expressed genes in ESCs whose expression is partly maintained by TET2-mediated DNA demethylation. TETs and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) are also strongly enriched at the 5' UTR of full-length, evolutionarily young LINE-1 elements, a pattern that is conserved in human ESCs. TETs drive LINE-1 demethylation, but surprisingly, LINE-1s are kept repressed through additional TET-dependent activities. We find that the SIN3A co-repressive complex binds to LINE-1s, ensuring their repression in a TET1-dependent manner. Our data implicate TET enzymes in the evolutionary dynamics of TEs, both in the context of exaptation processes and of retrotransposition control. The dual role of TET action on LINE-1s may reflect the evolutionary battle between TEs and the host.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 25%
Researcher 26 22%
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 54 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 7%
Computer Science 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 14 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2020.
All research outputs
#818,499
of 17,960,381 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#738
of 3,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,273
of 400,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#70
of 261 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,960,381 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,685 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 400,277 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 261 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.