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Evaluation of leaf removal as a means to reduce nutrient concentrations and loads in urban stormwater

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Evaluation of leaf removal as a means to reduce nutrient concentrations and loads in urban stormwater
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

William R. Selbig

Abstract

While the sources of nutrients to urban stormwater are many, the primary contributor is often organic detritus, especially in areas with dense overhead tree canopy. One way to remove organic detritus before it becomes entrained in runoff is to implement a city-wide leaf collection and street cleaning program. Improving our knowledge of the potential reduction of nutrients to stormwater through removal of leaves and other organic detritus on streets could help tailor more targeted municipal leaf collection programs. This study characterized an upper ideal limit in reductions of total and dissolved forms of phosphorus and nitrogen in stormwater through implementation of a municipal leaf collection and street cleaning program in Madison, WI, USA. Additional measures were taken to remove leaf litter from street surfaces prior to precipitation events. Loads of total and dissolved phosphorus were reduced by 84 and 83% (p<0.05), and total and dissolved nitrogen by 74 and 71% (p<0.05) with an active leaf removal program. Without leaf removal, 56% of the annual total phosphorus yield (winter excluded) was due to leaf litter in the fall compared to 16% with leaf removal. Despite significant reductions in load, total nitrogen showed only minor changes in fall yields without and with leaf removal at 19 and 16%, respectively. The majority of nutrient concentrations were in the dissolved fraction making source control through leaf removal one of the few treatment options available to environmental managers when reducing the amount of dissolved nutrients in stormwater runoff. Subsequently, the efficiency, frequency, and timing of leaf removal and street cleaning are the primary factors to consider when developing a leaf management program.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 25%
Student > Master 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Other 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 20 42%
Unspecified 10 21%
Engineering 8 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2018.
All research outputs
#619,689
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#384
of 9,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,999
of 371,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#31
of 445 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 445 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.