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Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid represses glioma stem-like cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, November 2016
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Title
Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid represses glioma stem-like cells
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12929-016-0296-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Che-Chia Hsu, Wen-Chang Chang, Tsung-I Hsu, Jr-Jiun Liu, Shiu-Hwa Yeh, Jia-Yi Wang, Jing-Ping Liou, Chiung-Yuan Ko, Kwang-Yu Chang, Jian-Ying Chuang

Abstract

Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are proposed to be responsible for high resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment. In order to find new strategies aimed at reducing GSC stemness and improving GBM patient survival, we investigated the effects and mechanism of a histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), since HDAC activity has been linked to cancer stem-like cell (CSC) abundance and properties. Human GBM cell lines were plated in serum-free suspension cultures allowed for sphere forming and CSC enrichment. Subsequently, upon SAHA treatment, the stemness markers, cell proliferation, and viability of GSCs as well as cellular apoptosis and senescence were examined in order to clarify whether inhibition of GSCs occurs. We demonstrated that SAHA attenuated cell proliferation and diminished the expression stemness-related markers (CD133 and Bmi1) in GSCs. Furthermore, at high concentrations (more than 5 μM), SAHA triggered apoptosis of GSCs accompanied by increases in both activation of caspase 8- and caspase 9-mediated pathways. Interestingly, we found that a lower dose of SAHA (1 μM and 2.5 μM) inhibited GSCs via cell cycle arrest and induced premature senescence through p53 up-regulation and p38 activation. SAHA induces apoptosis and functions as a potent modulator of senescence via the p38-p53 pathway in GSCs. Our results provide a perspective on targeting GSCs via SAHA treatment, and suggest that SAHA could be used as a potent agent to overcome drug resistance in GBM patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Master 1 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2016.
All research outputs
#7,530,096
of 8,683,790 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#311
of 382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#240,871
of 298,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#13
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,683,790 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 382 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.