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Characteristic tetrapod musculoskeletal limb phenotype emerged more than 400 MYA in basal lobe-finned fishes

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
63 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
Characteristic tetrapod musculoskeletal limb phenotype emerged more than 400 MYA in basal lobe-finned fishes
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep37592
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rui Diogo, Peter Johnston, Julia L. Molnar, Borja Esteve-Altava, Diogo, Rui, Johnston, Peter, Molnar, Julia L, Esteve-Altava, Borja

Abstract

Previous accounts of the origin of tetrapod limbs have postulated a relatively sudden change, after the split between extant lobe-finned fish and tetrapods, from a very simple fin phenotype with only two muscles to the highly complex tetrapod condition. The evolutionary changes that led to the muscular anatomy of tetrapod limbs have therefore remained relatively unexplored. We performed dissections, histological sections, and MRI scans of the closest living relatives of tetrapods: coelacanths and lungfish. Combined with previous comparative, developmental and paleontological information, our findings suggest that the characteristic tetrapod musculoskeletal limb phenotype was already present in the Silurian last common ancestor of extant sarcopterygians, with the exception of the autopod (hand/foot) structures, which have no clear correspondence with fish structures. Remarkably, the two major steps in this long process - leading to the ancestral fin anatomy of extant sarcopterygians and limb anatomy of extant tetrapods, respectively - occurred at the same nodes as the two major similarity bottlenecks that led to the striking derived myological similarity between the pectoral and pelvic appendages within each taxon. Our identification of probable homologies between appendicular muscles of sarcopterygian fish and tetrapods will allow more detailed reconstructions of muscle anatomy in early tetrapods and their relatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 63 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 28 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 27%
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 60%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 20%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#264,062
of 11,473,376 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,244
of 49,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,659
of 320,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#203
of 3,023 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,473,376 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 49,645 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,023 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.