↓ Skip to main content

Long-term consumption of an obesogenic high fat diet prior to ischemia-reperfusion mediates cardioprotection via Epac1-dependent signaling

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Long-term consumption of an obesogenic high fat diet prior to ischemia-reperfusion mediates cardioprotection via Epac1-dependent signaling
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12986-016-0147-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

F. Edland, A. Wergeland, R. Kopperud, K. S. Åsrud, E. A. Hoivik, S. L. Witsø, R. Æsøy, L. Madsen, K. Kristiansen, M. Bakke, S. O. Døskeland, A. K. Jonassen

Abstract

Obesity is still considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, although more recent knowledge also suggests obesity to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality - the "obesity paradox". This study explores if long-term feeding of an obesogenic high fat diet renders the myocardium less susceptible to ischemic-reperfusion induced injury via Epac-dependent signaling. Wild type (wt), Epac1 (Epac1(-/-)) and Epac2 (Epac2(-/-)) deficient mice were fed a high fat (HFD) or normal chow diet (ND) for 33 ± 1 weeks. Six experimental groups were included: (1) control wt ND (wt ND), (2) control wt HFD (wt HFD), (3) Epac1(-/-) mice on ND (Epac1(-/-)ND), (4) Epac1(-/-) mice on HFD (Epac1(-/-)HFD), (5) Epac2(-/-) mice on ND (Epac2(-/-)ND), and (6) Epac2(-/-) mice on HFD (Epac2(-/-)HFD). Isolated ex vivo mice hearts were perfused in a constant pressure Langendorff mode, and exposed to 30min of global ischemia (GI) and 60min of reperfusion. Endpoints were infarct size and functional recovery. All groups fed a HFD presented with significantly enhanced body weight, visceral fat content and reduced glucose clearance compared to corresponding ND groups. Although the HFD cohorts presented with an overall comparable systemic capability to clear glucose, the Epac1(-/-) HFD group presented with glucose levels slightly above the human diabetes criteria at the end of the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (ipGTT). Moreover, the HFD significantly reduced infarct size in both wild type (wt HFD 41.3 ± 5.5% vs. wt ND 58.0 ± 9.8%, p < 0.05) and Epac2(-/-) cohorts (Epac2(-/-)HFD 34.4 ± 7.2% vs. Epac2(-/-)ND 56.5 ± 3.8%, p < 0.05). Interestingly, however, the HFD did not reduce infarct size in Epac1(-/-) deficient mice hearts (Epac1(-/-)HFD 65.1 ± 5.1% vs. Epac1(-/-)ND 56.1 ± 3.5%, ns.). Epac1-dependent signaling is involved in mediating the cardioprotection afforded by long-term feeding of an obesogenic high fat diet in mice hearts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Postgraduate 2 17%
Student > Master 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Unknown 4 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,692,578
of 8,696,028 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#397
of 542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,915
of 298,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#15
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,696,028 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 542 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.