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DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins

Overview of attention for article published in Nucleic Acids Research, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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170 Dimensions

Readers on

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179 Mendeley
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Title
DisProt 7.0: a major update of the database of disordered proteins
Published in
Nucleic Acids Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1093/nar/gkw1056
Pubmed ID
Authors

Damiano Piovesan, Francesco Tabaro, Ivan Mičetić, Marco Necci, Federica Quaglia, Christopher J. Oldfield, Maria Cristina Aspromonte, Norman E. Davey, Radoslav Davidović, Zsuzsanna Dosztányi, Arne Elofsson, Alessandra Gasparini, András Hatos, Andrey V. Kajava, Lajos Kalmar, Emanuela Leonardi, Tamas Lazar, Sandra Macedo-Ribeiro, Mauricio Macossay-Castillo, Attila Meszaros, Giovanni Minervini, Nikoletta Murvai, Jordi Pujols, Daniel B. Roche, Edoardo Salladini, Eva Schad, Antoine Schramm, Beata Szabo, Agnes Tantos, Fiorella Tonello, Konstantinos D. Tsirigos, Nevena Veljković, Salvador Ventura, Wim Vranken, Per Warholm, Vladimir N. Uversky, A. Keith Dunker, Sonia Longhi, Peter Tompa, Silvio C.E. Tosatto

Abstract

The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt, URL: www.disprot.org) has been significantly updated and upgraded since its last major renewal in 2007. The current release holds information on more than 800 entries of IDPs/IDRs, i.e. intrinsically disordered proteins or regions that exist and function without a well-defined three-dimensional structure. We have re-curated previous entries to purge DisProt from conflicting cases, and also upgraded the functional classification scheme to reflect continuous advance in the field in the past 10 years or so. We define IDPs as proteins that are disordered along their entire sequence, i.e. entirely lack structural elements, and IDRs as regions that are at least five consecutive residues without well-defined structure. We base our assessment of disorder strictly on experimental evidence, such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (primary techniques) and a broad range of other experimental approaches (secondary techniques). Confident and ambiguous annotations are highlighted separately. DisProt 7.0 presents classified knowledge regarding the experimental characterization and functional annotations of IDPs/IDRs, and is intended to provide an invaluable resource for the research community for a better understanding structural disorder and for developing better computational tools for studying disordered proteins.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Estonia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 176 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 23%
Researcher 37 21%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 4%
Other 28 16%
Unknown 27 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 66 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 22%
Chemistry 17 9%
Computer Science 9 5%
Physics and Astronomy 4 2%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 32 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,999,063
of 12,028,685 outputs
Outputs from Nucleic Acids Research
#3,846
of 20,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,598
of 329,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nucleic Acids Research
#99
of 258 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,028,685 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,217 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 258 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.