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Quantifying gas emissions from the “Millennium Eruption” of Paektu volcano, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea/China

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
26 news outlets
twitter
44 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Quantifying gas emissions from the “Millennium Eruption” of Paektu volcano, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea/China
Published in
Science Advances, November 2016
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1600913
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kayla Iacovino, Kim Ju-Song, Thomas Sisson, Jacob Lowenstern, Ri Kuk-Hun, Jang Jong-Nam, Song Kun-Ho, Ham Song-Hwan, Clive Oppenheimer, James O. S. Hammond, Amy Donovan, Kosima W. Liu, Ryu Kum-Ran

Abstract

Paektu volcano (Changbaishan) is a rhyolitic caldera that straddles the border between the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and China. Its most recent large eruption was the Millennium Eruption (ME; 23 km(3) dense rock equivalent) circa 946 CE, which resulted in the release of copious magmatic volatiles (H2O, CO2, sulfur, and halogens). Accurate quantification of volatile yield and composition is critical in assessing volcanogenic climate impacts but is challenging, particularly for events before the satellite era. We use a geochemical technique to quantify volatile composition and upper bounds to yields for the ME by examining trends in incompatible trace and volatile element concentrations in crystal-hosted melt inclusions. We estimate that the ME could have emitted as much as 45 Tg of S to the atmosphere. This is greater than the quantity of S released by the 1815 eruption of Tambora, which contributed to the "year without a summer." Our maximum gas yield estimates place the ME among the strongest emitters of climate-forcing gases in the Common Era. However, ice cores from Greenland record only a relatively weak sulfate signal attributed to the ME. We suggest that other factors came into play in minimizing the glaciochemical signature. This paradoxical case in which high S emissions do not result in a strong glacial sulfate signal may present a way forward in building more generalized models for interpreting which volcanic eruptions have produced large climate impacts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 44 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 30%
Student > Master 8 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 21 78%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Engineering 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 250. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2021.
All research outputs
#81,070
of 17,913,039 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#722
of 6,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,061
of 399,455 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#26
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,913,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 119.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 399,455 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.