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Foraging synchrony drives resilience in human–dolphin mutualism

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2023
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
340 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
143 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
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Title
Foraging synchrony drives resilience in human–dolphin mutualism
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2023
DOI 10.1073/pnas.2207739120
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mauricio Cantor, Damien R. Farine, Fábio G. Daura-Jorge

Abstract

Interactions between humans and nature have profound consequences, which rarely are mutually beneficial. Further, behavioral and environmental changes can turn human-wildlife cooperative interactions into conflicts, threatening their continued existence. By tracking fine-scale behavioral interactions between artisanal fishers and wild dolphins targeting migratory mullets, we reveal that foraging synchrony is key to benefiting both predators. Dolphins herd mullet schools toward the coast, increasing prey availability within the reach of the net-casting fishers, who gain higher foraging success-but only when matching the casting behavior with the dolphins' foraging cues. In turn, when dolphins approach the fishers' nets closely and cue fishers in, they dive for longer and modify their active foraging echolocation to match the time it takes for nets to sink and close over mullets-but only when fishers respond to their foraging cues appropriately. Using long-term demographic surveys, we show that cooperative foraging generates socioeconomic benefits for net-casting fishers and ca. 13% survival benefits for cooperative dolphins by minimizing spatial overlap with bycatch-prone fisheries. However, recent declines in mullet availability are threatening these short- and long-term benefits by reducing the foraging success of net-casting fishers and increasing the exposure of dolphins to bycatch in the alternative fisheries. Using a numerical model parametrized with our empirical data, we predict that environmental and behavioral changes are pushing this traditional human-dolphin cooperation toward extinction. We propose two possible conservation actions targeting fishers' behavior that could prevent the erosion of this century-old fishery, thereby safeguarding one of the last remaining cases of human-wildlife cooperation.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 143 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Other 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 37%
Environmental Science 6 14%
Mathematics 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 28%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2706. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2023.
All research outputs
#2,636
of 25,252,667 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#79
of 102,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80
of 470,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1
of 908 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,252,667 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 102,634 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 470,136 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 908 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.