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Shifts in outcrossing rates and changes to floral traits are associated with the evolution of herbicide resistance in the common morning glory

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
27 X users
patent
1 patent
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
82 Mendeley
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Title
Shifts in outcrossing rates and changes to floral traits are associated with the evolution of herbicide resistance in the common morning glory
Published in
Ecology Letters, November 2016
DOI 10.1111/ele.12703
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Kuester, Eva Fall, Shu‐Mei Chang, Regina S. Baucom

Abstract

Human-mediated selection can strongly influence the evolutionary response of natural organisms within ecological timescales. But what traits allow for, or even facilitate, adaptation to the strong selection humans impose on natural systems? Using a combination of laboratory and greenhouse studies of 32 natural populations of the common agricultural weed, Ipomoea purpurea, we show that herbicide-resistant populations self-fertilise more than susceptible populations. We likewise show that anther-stigma distance, a floral trait associated with self-fertilisation in this species, exhibits a nonlinear relationship with resistance such that the most and least resistant populations exhibit lower anther-stigma separation compared to populations with moderate levels of resistance. Overall, our results extend the general finding that plant mating can be impacted by human-mediated agents of selection to that of the extreme selection of the agricultural system. This work highlights the influence of human-mediated selection on rapid responses of natural populations that can lead to unexpected long-term evolutionary consequences.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Serbia 1 1%
Unknown 80 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 26%
Student > Master 15 18%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 59%
Environmental Science 10 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 18 22%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2021.
All research outputs
#616,359
of 25,905,864 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#281
of 3,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,337
of 418,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#6
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,905,864 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,168 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 418,809 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.