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Content and Evaluation of the Benefits of Effective Exercise for Older Adults With Knee Pain Trial Physiotherapist Training Program

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Content and Evaluation of the Benefits of Effective Exercise for Older Adults With Knee Pain Trial Physiotherapist Training Program
Published in
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.10.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melanie A. Holden, Rebecca Whittle, Emma L. Healey, Susan Hill, Ricky Mullis, Edward Roddy, Gail Sowden, Stephanie Tooth, Nadine E. Foster

Abstract

To explore whether participating in the BEEP trial training programme (ISRCTN93634563) increased physiotherapists' self-confidence, and changed their intended clinical behaviour, regarding exercise for knee pain in older adults. Before/after training programme evaluation. Physiotherapists were asked to complete a questionnaire before the BEEP trial training programme, immediately afterwards, and 12-18 months later (post-intervention delivery in the BEEP trial). The questionnaire included a case vignette and associated clinical management questions. Questionnaire responses were compared over time and between physiotherapists trained to deliver each intervention within the BEEP trial. Primary care. 53 physiotherapists who completed the BEEP trial training programme. NA MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 1. Self-confidence in the diagnosis and management of knee pain in older adults, 2. intended clinical behaviour measured by a case vignette and associated clinical management questions. 52 (98%) physiotherapists returned the pre-training questionnaire, 44 (85%) and 39 (74%) returned the post-training and post-intervention questionnaires respectively. Post-training, self-confidence in managing older adults with knee pain increased, and intended clinical behaviour regarding exercise for knee pain in older adults appeared more in line with clinical guidelines. However, not all positive changes were maintained in the longer-term. Participating in the BEEP trial training programme increased physiotherapists' self-confidence and changed their intended clinical behaviour regarding exercise for knee pain but by 12-18 months later, some of these positive changes were lost. This suggests that brief training programmes are useful, but additional strategies are likely to be needed to successfully maintain changes in clinical behaviour over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 12 36%
Student > Bachelor 8 24%
Student > Master 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,246,230
of 12,355,877 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
#2,167
of 3,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,791
of 342,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
#67
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,355,877 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,765 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.