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Cerebral organoids in primary progressive multiple sclerosis reveal stem cell and oligodendrocyte differentiation defect

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Open, March 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 1,679)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
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Title
Cerebral organoids in primary progressive multiple sclerosis reveal stem cell and oligodendrocyte differentiation defect
Published in
Biology Open, March 2023
DOI 10.1242/bio.059845
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicolas Daviaud, Eric Chen, Tara Edwards, Saud A. Sadiq

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune inflammatory disorder affecting the central nervous system. The cause of the disease is unknown but both genetic and environmental factors are implicated in the pathogenesis. We derived cerebral organoids from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) of healthy control subjects as well as from primary progressive MS (PPMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS) and relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients to better understand the pathologic basis of the varied clinical phenotypic expressions of MS. In MS organoids, most notably in PPMS, we observed a decrease of proliferation marker Ki67 and a reduction of the SOX2+ stem cell pool associated with an increased expression of neuronal markers CTIP2 and TBR1 as well as a strong decrease of oligodendrocyte differentiation. This dysregulation of the stem cell pool is associated with a decreased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Our findings show that the genetic background of a patient can directly alter stem cell function, provides new insights on the innate cellular dysregulation in MS and identifies p21 pathway as a new potential target for therapeutic strategies in MS.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Unspecified 2 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 12%
Neuroscience 2 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 47%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 51. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2023.
All research outputs
#768,279
of 24,153,435 outputs
Outputs from Biology Open
#26
of 1,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,451
of 408,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Open
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,153,435 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,679 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.