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Caffeine for apnea of prematurity: Effects on the developing brain

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroToxicology, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 Facebook pages
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2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Caffeine for apnea of prematurity: Effects on the developing brain
Published in
NeuroToxicology, January 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.neuro.2016.11.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anzari Atik, Richard Harding, Robert De Matteo, Delphi Kondos-Devcic, Jeanie Cheong, Lex W. Doyle, Mary Tolcos

Abstract

Caffeine is a methylxanthine that is widely used to treat apnea of prematurity (AOP). In preterm infants, caffeine reduces the duration of respiratory support, improves survival rates and lowers the incidence of cerebral palsy and cognitive delay. There is, however, little evidence relating to the immediate and long-term effects of caffeine on brain development, especially at the cellular and molecular levels. Experimental data are conflicting, with studies showing that caffeine can have either adverse or benefical effects in the developing brain. The aim of this article is to review current understanding of how caffeine ameliorates AOP, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which caffeine exerts its effects and the effects of caffeine on brain development. A better knowledge of the effects of caffeine on the developing brain at the cellular and/or molecular level is essential in order to understand the basis for the impact of caffeine on postnatal outcome. The studies reviewed here suggest that while caffeine has respiratory benefits for preterm infants, it may have adverse molecular and cellular effects on the developing brain; indeed a majority of experimental studies suggest that regardless of dose or duration of administration, caffeine leads to detrimental changes within the developing brain. Thus there is an urgent need to assess the impact of caffeine, at a range of doses, on the structure and function of the developing brain in preclinical studies, particularly using clinically relevant animal models. Future studies should focus on determining the maximal dose of caffeine that is safe for the preterm brain.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Master 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 15 21%
Unknown 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 30%
Neuroscience 7 10%
Unspecified 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 21 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,350,643
of 12,390,159 outputs
Outputs from NeuroToxicology
#288
of 926 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,701
of 349,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroToxicology
#8
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,390,159 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 926 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.