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Fragility and resilience: parental and family perspectives on the impacts of extreme prematurity

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition, March 2023
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

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2 blogs
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17 X users
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1 Facebook page

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Title
Fragility and resilience: parental and family perspectives on the impacts of extreme prematurity
Published in
Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition, March 2023
DOI 10.1136/archdischild-2022-325011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annie Janvier, Claude Julie Bourque, Rebecca Pearce, Emilie Thivierge, Laurie-Anne Duquette, Magdalena Jaworski, Keith J Barrington, Anne R Synnes, Paige Church, Thuy Mai Luu

Abstract

Extremely preterm babies have a significant risk of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). There has been little investigation regarding the impact of prematurity on families. The objective of this study was to explore parental perspectives regarding the impact of prematurity on themselves/their family. Over 1 year, parents of children born <29 weeks' gestational age (GA) who were between 18 months old and 7 years old and came for their follow-up visit were invited to participate. They were asked to categorise the impacts of prematurity on their life and their family as positive, negative or both and to describe those impacts in their own words. Thematic analysis was performed by a multidisciplinary group, including parents. Logistic regression was performed to compare parental responses. Among parents (n=248, 98% participation rate), most (74%) reported that their child's prematurity had both positive and negative impacts on their life or their family's life, while 18% reported only positive impacts and 8% only negative impacts. These proportions were not correlated with GA, brain injury, nor level of NDI. The positive impacts reported included: an improved outlook on life, such as gratitude and perspective (48%), stronger family relationships (31%) and the gift of the child (28%). The negative themes were stress and fear (42%), loss of equilibrium due to medical fragility (35%) and concerns about developmental outcomes including the child's future (18%). Parents report both positive and negative impacts after an extremely preterm birth, independent of disability. These balanced perspectives should be included in neonatal research, clinical care and provider education.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Unknown 11 85%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Arts and Humanities 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Unknown 10 77%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2024.
All research outputs
#1,683,550
of 25,734,859 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition
#221
of 2,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,180
of 424,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Disease in Childhood -- Fetal & Neonatal Edition
#7
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,734,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 424,432 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.