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Neurotrophin-3-Mediated Regeneration and Recovery of Proprioception Following Dorsal Rhizotomy

Overview of attention for article published in MCN: Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience, February 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source

Citations

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88 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Neurotrophin-3-Mediated Regeneration and Recovery of Proprioception Following Dorsal Rhizotomy
Published in
MCN: Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience, February 2002
DOI 10.1006/mcne.2001.1067
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matt S. Ramer, Thomas Bishop, Peter Dockery, Makarim S. Mobarak, Donald O'Leary, John P. Fraher, John V. Priestley, Stephen B. McMahon

Abstract

Injured dorsal root axons fail to regenerate into the adult spinal cord, leading to permanent sensory loss. We investigated the ability of intrathecal neurotrophin-3 (NT3) to promote axonal regeneration across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) and functional recovery in adult rats. Quantitative electron microscopy showed robust penetration of CNS tissue by regenerating sensory axons treated with NT3 at 1 and 2 weeks postrhizotomy. Light and electron microscopical anterograde tracing experiments showed that these axons reentered appropriate and ectopic laminae of the dorsal horn, where they formed vesicle-filled synaptic buttons. Cord dorsum potential recordings confirmed that these were functional. In behavioral studies, NT3-treated (but not untreated or vehicle-treated) rats regained proprioception. Recovery depended on NT3-mediated sensory regeneration: preventing regeneration by root excision prevented recovery. NT3 treatment allows sensory axons to overcome inhibition present at the DREZ and may thus serve to promote functional recovery following dorsal root avulsions in humans.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 9 26%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Master 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 17%
Neuroscience 6 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Engineering 1 3%
Other 8 23%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2005.
All research outputs
#3,490,531
of 12,196,805 outputs
Outputs from MCN: Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience
#257
of 976 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,362
of 332,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from MCN: Molecular & Cellular Neuroscience
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,805 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 976 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.