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Conservation status of polar bears ( Ursus maritimus ) in relation to projected sea-ice declines

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 2,556)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
55 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
105 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Conservation status of polar bears ( Ursus maritimus ) in relation to projected sea-ice declines
Published in
Biology Letters, December 2016
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0556
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric V. Regehr, Kristin L. Laidre, H. Resit Akçakaya, Steven C. Amstrup, Todd C. Atwood, Nicholas J. Lunn, Martyn Obbard, Harry Stern, Gregory W. Thiemann, Øystein Wiig

Abstract

Loss of Arctic sea ice owing to climate change is the primary threat to polar bears throughout their range. We evaluated the potential response of polar bears to sea-ice declines by (i) calculating generation length (GL) for the species, which determines the timeframe for conservation assessments; (ii) developing a standardized sea-ice metric representing important habitat; and (iii) using statistical models and computer simulation to project changes in the global population under three approaches relating polar bear abundance to sea ice. Mean GL was 11.5 years. Ice-covered days declined in all subpopulation areas during 1979-2014 (median -1.26 days year(-1)). The estimated probabilities that reductions in the mean global population size of polar bears will be greater than 30%, 50% and 80% over three generations (35-41 years) were 0.71 (range 0.20-0.95), 0.07 (range 0-0.35) and less than 0.01 (range 0-0.02), respectively. According to IUCN Red List reduction thresholds, which provide a common measure of extinction risk across taxa, these results are consistent with listing the species as vulnerable. Our findings support the potential for large declines in polar bear numbers owing to sea-ice loss, and highlight near-term uncertainty in statistical projections as well as the sensitivity of projections to different plausible assumptions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 105 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 109 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 31 28%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 15%
Researcher 13 12%
Professor 8 7%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 10 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 39%
Environmental Science 25 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 9%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 14 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 567. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2019.
All research outputs
#13,449
of 13,941,062 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#20
of 2,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#798
of 379,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#4
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,941,062 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,556 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 379,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.