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Neuroethics and Disorders of Consciousness: Discerning Brain States in Clinical Practice and Research

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
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13 tweeters

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38 Mendeley
Title
Neuroethics and Disorders of Consciousness: Discerning Brain States in Clinical Practice and Research
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, December 2016
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2016.18.12.ecas2-1612
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Decisions about end-of-life care and participation in clinical research for patients with disorders of consciousness begin with diagnostic discernment. Accurately distinguishing between brain states clarifies clinicians' ethical obligations and responsibilities. Central to this effort is the obligation to provide neuropalliative care for patients in the minimally conscious state who can perceive pain and to restore functional communication through neuroprosthetics, drugs, and rehabilitation to patients with intact but underactivated neural networks. Efforts to bring scientific advances to patients with disorders of consciousness are reviewed, including the investigational use of deep brain stimulation in patients in the minimally conscious state. These efforts help to affirm the civil rights of a population long on the margins.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 10 26%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Neuroscience 8 21%
Psychology 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 24%