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Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis reveals a high level of dietary specialization in killer whales across the North Atlantic

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, April 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 3,296)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

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32 news outlets
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127 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis reveals a high level of dietary specialization in killer whales across the North Atlantic
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, April 2023
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.13920
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anaïs Remili, Rune Dietz, Christian Sonne, Filipa I. P. Samarra, Audun H. Rikardsen, Lisa E. Kettemer, Steven H. Ferguson, Cortney A. Watt, Cory J. D. Matthews, Jeremy J. Kiszka, Eve Jourdain, Katrine Borgå, Anders Ruus, Sandra M. Granquist, Aqqalu Rosing‐Asvid, Melissa A. McKinney

Abstract

Quantifying the diet composition of apex marine predators such as killer whales (Orcinus orca) is critical to assessing their food web impacts. Yet, with few exceptions, the feeding ecology of these apex predators remains poorly understood. Here, we use our newly validated quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) approach on nearly 200 killer whales and over 900 potential prey to model their diets across the 5000 km span of the North Atlantic. Diet estimates show that killer whales mainly consume other whales in the western North Atlantic (Canadian Arctic, Eastern Canada), seals in the mid-North Atlantic (Greenland), and fish in the eastern North Atlantic (Iceland, Faroe Islands, Norway). Nonetheless, diet estimates also varied widely among individuals within most regions. This level of inter-individual feeding variation should be considered for future ecological studies focusing on killer whales in the North Atlantic and other oceans. These estimates reveal remarkable population- and individual-level variation in the trophic ecology of these killer whales, which can help to assess how their predation impacts community and ecosystem dynamics in changing North Atlantic marine ecosystems. This new approach provides researchers with an invaluable tool to study the feeding ecology of oceanic top predators.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 127 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Other 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 41%
Environmental Science 6 15%
Unspecified 1 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 314. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2023.
All research outputs
#112,584
of 26,107,266 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#21
of 3,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,907
of 426,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#1
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,107,266 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,296 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 426,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.