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Chronic toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments: Variation in toxicity among eight invertebrate taxa and eight sediments

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, July 2013
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Title
Chronic toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments: Variation in toxicity among eight invertebrate taxa and eight sediments
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, July 2013
DOI 10.1002/etc.2271
Pubmed ID
Authors

John M. Besser, William G. Brumbaugh, Christopher G. Ingersoll, Chris D. Ivey, James L. Kunz, Nile E. Kemble, Christian E. Schlekat, Emily Rogevich Garman

Abstract

This study evaluated the chronic toxicity of Ni-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates. A 2-step spiking procedure (spiking and sediment dilution) and a 2-stage equilibration period (10 wk anaerobic and 1 wk aerobic) were used to spike 8 freshwater sediments with wide ranges of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS; 0.94-38 µmol/g) and total organic carbon (TOC; 0.42-10%). Chronic sediment toxicity tests were conducted with 8 invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus dilutus, Hexagenia sp., Lumbriculus variegatus, Tubifex tubifex, and Lampsilis siliquoidea) in 2 spiked sediments. Nickel toxicity thresholds estimated from species-sensitivity distributions were 97 µg/g and 752 µg/g (total recoverable Ni; dry wt basis) for sediments with low and high concentrations of AVS and TOC, respectively. Sensitive species were tested with 6 additional sediments. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) for Hyalella and Gammarus, but not Hexagenia, were consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks based on Ni in porewater and in simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) normalized to AVS and TOC. For Hexagenia, sediment EC20s increased at less than an equimolar basis with increased AVS, and toxicity occurred in several sediments with Ni concentrations in SEM less than AVS. The authors hypothesize that circulation of oxygenated water by Hexagenia led to oxidation of AVS in burrows, creating microenvironments with high Ni exposure. Despite these unexpected results, a strong relationship between Hexagenia EC20s and AVS could provide a basis for conservative site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Ni.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 30%
Researcher 8 27%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2013.
All research outputs
#11,735,591
of 13,219,841 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#3,373
of 3,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,809
of 149,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#16
of 40 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 3,843 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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