↓ Skip to main content

'How and why are video consultations used in urgent primary care settings in the UK? A focus group study'

Overview of attention for article published in BJGP Open, April 2023
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
27 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
3 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
'How and why are video consultations used in urgent primary care settings in the UK? A focus group study'
Published in
BJGP Open, April 2023
DOI 10.3399/bjgpo.2023.0025
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Elizabeth Payne, Aileen Clarke

Abstract

Video consulting was widely rolled out across general practice at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the in-hours setting there has been a marked shift away from using the technology, but many urgent care clinicians continue to use video consulting. Little is known about the reasons behind this discrepancy. To understand how and why video is used in urgent care settings DESIGN AND SETTING: Focus groups were held via Microsoft Teams with 11 General Practitioners (GPs) working in in- and out- of hours settings across the UK. GPs were recruited through a purposive sampling strategy. Meetings were recorded, auto-transcribed and checked for accuracy. A thematic analysis was performed. Urgent care GPs usedvideo as an adjunct to the telephone in the initial assessment of patients and felt it helped direct patients to the right service first time. They were confident using video for a broad range of presenting conditions. They felt it created additional trust and rapport with patients and was useful for bringing third parties into the consultation. They felt that it allowed them to maximise resources and use shielded colleagues effectively. They were more likely to have received 1-1 training and this was seen as vital for effective implementation within an organisation CONCLUSION: Video consulting is useful in the urgent care setting as an adjunct to telephone consulting. It is particularly helpful in the initial triage of patients. 1-1 training is needed for effective implementation.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 67%
Unknown 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Arts and Humanities 1 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%
Sports and Recreations 1 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 February 2024.
All research outputs
#1,959,291
of 25,390,203 outputs
Outputs from BJGP Open
#121
of 631 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,302
of 404,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BJGP Open
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,390,203 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 631 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 404,508 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.