↓ Skip to main content

Novel Husbandry Practices Result in Rapid Rates of Growth and Sexual Maturation Without Impacting Adult Behavior in the Blind Mexican Cavefish

Overview of attention for article published in Zebrafish, April 2023
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Novel Husbandry Practices Result in Rapid Rates of Growth and Sexual Maturation Without Impacting Adult Behavior in the Blind Mexican Cavefish
Published in
Zebrafish, April 2023
DOI 10.1089/zeb.2023.0001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert A. Kozol, Anders Yuiska, Ji Heon Han, Bernadeth Tolentino, Arthur Lopatto, Peter Lewis, Alexandra Paz, Alex C. Keene, Johanna E. Kowalko, Erik R. Duboué

Abstract

Animal model systems are dependent on the standardization of husbandry protocols that maximize growth and reduce generation time. The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, exists as eyed surface and blind cave dwelling populations. The opportunity for comparative approaches between independently evolved populations has led to the rapid growth of A. mexicanus as a model for evolution and biomedical research. However, a slow and inconsistent growth rate remains a major limitation to the expanded application of A. mexicanus. Fortunately, this temporal limitation can be addressed through husbandry changes that accelerate growth rates while maintaining optimal health outcomes. Here, we describe a husbandry protocol that produces rapid growth rates through changes in diet, feeding frequency, growth sorting and progressive changes in tank size. This protocol produced robust growth rates and decreased the age of sexual maturity in comparison to our previous protocol. To determine whether changes in feeding impacted behavior, we tested fish in exploration and schooling assays. We found no difference in behavior between the two groups, suggesting that increased feeding and rapid growth will not impact the natural variation in behavioral traits. Taken together, this standardized husbandry protocol will accelerate the development of A. mexicanus as a genetic model.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 13%
Researcher 1 13%
Unknown 4 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Neuroscience 1 13%
Unknown 4 50%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2023.
All research outputs
#6,761,242
of 25,394,764 outputs
Outputs from Zebrafish
#68
of 463 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,802
of 419,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zebrafish
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,394,764 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 463 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,266 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them