↓ Skip to main content

Environmental signatures and effects of an oil and gas wastewater spill in the Williston Basin, North Dakota

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Environmental signatures and effects of an oil and gas wastewater spill in the Williston Basin, North Dakota
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, February 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.11.157
Pubmed ID
Authors

I.M. Cozzarelli, K.J. Skalak, D.B. Kent, M.A. Engle, A. Benthem, A.C. Mumford, K. Haase, A. Farag, D. Harper, S.C. Nagel, L.R. Iwanowicz, W.H. Orem, D.M. Akob, J.B. Jaeschke, J. Galloway, M. Kohler, D.L. Stoliker, G.D. Jolly

Abstract

Wastewaters from oil and gas development pose largely unknown risks to environmental resources. In January 2015, 11.4ML (million liters) of wastewater (300g/L TDS) from oil production in the Williston Basin was reported to have leaked from a pipeline, spilling into Blacktail Creek, North Dakota. Geochemical and biological samples were collected in February and June 2015 to identify geochemical signatures of spilled wastewaters as well as biological responses along a 44-km river reach. February water samples had elevated chloride (1030mg/L) and bromide (7.8mg/L) downstream from the spill, compared to upstream levels (11mg/L and <0.4mg/L, respectively). Lithium (0.25mg/L), boron (1.75mg/L) and strontium (7.1mg/L) were present downstream at 5-10 times upstream concentrations. Light hydrocarbon measurements indicated a persistent thermogenic source of methane in the stream. Semi-volatile hydrocarbons indicative of oil were not detected in filtered samples but low levels, including tetramethylbenzenes and di-methylnaphthalenes, were detected in unfiltered water samples downstream from the spill. Labile sediment-bound barium and strontium concentrations (June 2015) were higher downstream from the Spill Site. Radium activities in sediment downstream from the Spill Site were up to 15 times the upstream activities and, combined with Sr isotope ratios, suggest contributions from the pipeline fluid and support the conclusion that elevated concentrations in Blacktail Creek water are from the leaking pipeline. Results from June 2015 demonstrate the persistence of wastewater effects in Blacktail Creek several months after remediation efforts started. Aquatic health effects were observed in June 2015; fish bioassays showed only 2.5% survival at 7.1km downstream from the spill compared to 89% at the upstream reference site. Additional potential biological impacts were indicated by estrogenic inhibition in downstream waters. Our findings demonstrate that environmental signatures from wastewater spills are persistent and create the potential for long-term environmental health effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 113 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 20%
Researcher 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 20 17%
Student > Master 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 24 21%
Engineering 17 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 9%
Chemistry 6 5%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 24 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,808,168
of 18,200,907 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#1,906
of 18,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,921
of 400,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#61
of 496 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,200,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,270 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 400,819 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 496 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.