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Lethal heatwaves are challenging India’s sustainable development

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS Climate, April 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 263)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
110 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
109 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
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Title
Lethal heatwaves are challenging India’s sustainable development
Published in
PLOS Climate, April 2023
DOI 10.1371/journal.pclm.0000156
Authors

Ramit Debnath, Ronita Bardhan, Michelle L. Bell

Abstract

Due to the unprecedented burdens on public health, agriculture, and other socio-economic and cultural systems, climate change-induced heatwaves in India can hinder or reverse the country’s progress in fulfilling the sustainable development goals (SDGs). Moreover, the Indian government’s reliance on its Climate Vulnerability Index (CVI), which may underestimate the impact of heatwaves on the country’s developmental efforts. An analytical evaluation of heat index (HI) with CVI shows that more than 90% of the country is at extremely cautious or dangerous levels of adversely impacting adaptive livelihood capacity, food grains yield, vector-borne disease spread and urban sustainability. The results also show by examining Delhi’s urban heat risk that heatwaves will critically hamper SDG progress at the urban scale. Linking HI with CVI identifies more of India’s vulnerability and provides an opportunity to rethink India’s climate adaptation policies through international cooperation in designing holistic vulnerability assessment methodologies. The conclusion emphasizes the urgent need to improve extreme weather impact assessment by combining multiple layers of information within the existing climate vulnerability measurement frameworks that can account for the co-occurrence and collision of climate change events and non-climate structural SDG interventions.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 109 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 20 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Engineering 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 20 50%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 937. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2023.
All research outputs
#17,735
of 25,337,969 outputs
Outputs from PLOS Climate
#8
of 263 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#540
of 403,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS Climate
#1
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,337,969 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 263 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 79.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 403,373 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.