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Minimally invasive surgery versus radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy for small-volume primary oropharyngeal carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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168 Mendeley
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Title
Minimally invasive surgery versus radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy for small-volume primary oropharyngeal carcinoma
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010963.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Howard, Liam Masterson, Raghav C Dwivedi, Faruque Riffat, Richard Benson, Sarah Jefferies, Piyush Jani, James R Tysome, Chris Nutting

Abstract

More than 400,000 cases of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are diagnosed each year worldwide and the incidence is rising, partly as a result of human papillomavirus. Human papillomavirus-associated OPSCC affects younger patients and often presents at a higher stage; however, it is associated with a better prognosis.Until recently, first-line management of OPSCC involved chemoradiotherapy, as research had demonstrated comparable survival outcomes when compared with open surgery, with significantly decreased morbidity. However, interventions have now evolved with computerised planning and intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and the advent of endoscopic head and neck surgery, which provide the potential for decreased treatment-associated morbidity.The oropharynx plays an essential role in swallowing, speech and protecting the airway as it is situated at the bifurcation of the respiratory and digestive tracts. Treatment modality recommendations are based on survival outcomes. Given the younger patient demographic, establishing the safety of modalities that potentially have better functional outcome is becoming increasingly important. To assess the efficacy of endoscopic head and neck surgery (transoral robotic surgery or transoral laser microsurgery) for small-volume, primary (T1-2, N0-2) oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in comparison to radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 10); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 8 November 2016. Randomised controlled trials in patients with carcinoma in the oropharynx subsite (as defined by the World Health Organization classification C09, C10). Cancers included were primary squamous cell carcinomas arising from the oropharyngeal mucosa. The tumours were classified as T1-T2 with or without nodal disease and with no evidence of distant metastatic spread. The intervention was transoral, minimally invasive surgery with or without adjuvant radiotherapy or adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The comparator was primary radiotherapy with or without induction or concurrent chemotherapy for the tumour. The treatments received and compared were of curative intent and patients had not undergone prior intervention, other than diagnostic biopsy. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcomes were overall survival (disease-related mortality was to be studied where possible), locoregional control, disease-free survival and progression-free survival or time to recurrence. All outcomes were to be measured at two, three and five years after diagnosis. Our secondary outcomes included quality of life, harms associated with treatment, patient satisfaction and xerostomia score. No completed studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Two ongoing trials fulfilled the selection criteria, however neither are complete.'Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx: radiotherapy versus trans-oral robotic surgery (ORATOR)' is a phase II randomised controlled trial comparing primary radiation therapy with primary transoral robotic surgery for small-volume primary (T1-2, N0-2) OPSCC. It is currently in progress with an estimated completion date of June 2021.'European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 1420 (EORTC 1420-HNCG-ROG)' is a phase III, randomised study assessing the "best of" radiotherapy compared to transoral robotic surgery/transoral laser microsurgery in patients with T1-T2, N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and base of tongue. It was due to start accrual mid-2016. The role of endoscopic head and neck surgery in the management of OPSCC is clearly expanding as evidenced by its more overt incorporation into the current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Data are mounting regarding its outcomes both in terms of survival and lower morbidity. As confidence increases, it is being used in the management of more advanced OPSCC.Based on this review, there is currently no high-quality evidence from randomised controlled trials regarding clinical outcomes for patients with oropharyngeal cancer receiving endoscopic head and neck surgery compared with primary chemoradiotherapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 168 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 19%
Student > Master 27 16%
Researcher 20 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 10%
Other 13 8%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 29 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 80 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 5%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 44 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2017.
All research outputs
#133,430
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#310
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,407
of 366,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#7
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.