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Maternal Western-style diet in nonhuman primates leads to offspring islet adaptations including altered gene expression and insulin hypersecretion

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism, May 2023
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

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Title
Maternal Western-style diet in nonhuman primates leads to offspring islet adaptations including altered gene expression and insulin hypersecretion
Published in
American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism, May 2023
DOI 10.1152/ajpendo.00087.2023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darian T Carroll, Joseph M Elsakr, Allie Miller, Jennifer Fuhr, Sarah Rene Lindsley, Melissa Kirigiti, Diana L Takahashi, Tyler A Dean, Stephanie R Wesolowski, Carrie E McCurdy, Jacob E Friedman, Kjersti M Aagaard, Paul Kievit, Maureen Gannon

Abstract

Maternal overnutrition is associated with increased susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes in the offspring. Rodent models have shown that maternal overnutrition influences islet function in offspring. To determine whether maternal Western style diet (WSD) alters pre-juvenile islet function in a model that approximates that of human offspring, we utilized a well-characterized Japanese macaque model. We compared islet function from offspring exposed to WSD throughout pregnancy and lactation and weaned to WSD (WSD/WSD) compared to islets from offspring exposed only to post weaning WSD (CD/WSD) at 1 year of age. WSD/WSD offspring islets showed increased basal insulin secretion and an exaggerated increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, as assessed by dynamic ex vivo perifusion assays, relative to CD/WSD exposed offspring. We probed potential mechanisms underlying insulin hypersecretion using transmission electron microscopy to evaluate β-cell ultrastructure, qRT-PCR to quantify candidate gene expression, and Seahorse assay to assess mitochondrial function. Insulin granule density, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial DNA ratio were similar between groups. However, islets from WSD/WSD male and female offspring had increased expression of transcripts known to facilitate stimulus secretion coupling and changes in expression of cell stress genes. Seahorse assay revealed increased spare respiratory capacity in islets from WSD/WSD male offspring. Overall, these results show that maternal WSD feeding confers changes to genes governing insulin secretory coupling and results in insulin hypersecretion as early as the post-weaning period. The results suggest a maternal diet leads to early adaptation and developmental programming in offspring islet genes that may underlie future β-cell dysfunction.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1 Mendeley reader of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 1 100%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2023.
All research outputs
#1,444,003
of 25,754,670 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism
#209
of 2,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,413
of 410,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology & Metabolism
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,754,670 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 410,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.