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Day three versus day two embryo transfer following in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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6 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Day three versus day two embryo transfer following in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd004378.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brown, Julie, Daya, Salim, Matson, Phill, Julie Brown, Salim Daya, Phill Matson

Abstract

Embryo transfer (ET) was traditionally performed two days after oocyte retrieval; however, developments in culture media have allowed embryos to be maintained in culture for longer periods. Delaying transfer from Day two to Day three would allow for further development of the embryo and might have a positive effect on pregnancy outcomes. To determine if there are any differences in live birth and pregnancy rates when embryo transfer is performed on day three after oocyte retrieval, compared with day two, in infertile couples undergoing treatment with in vitro fertilisation (IVF), including intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid) from the inception of the databases to 26th April 2016. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO portal for ongoing trials plus citation lists of relevant publications, review articles and included studies, as well as abstracts of appropriate scientific meetings. Randomised controlled trials that compared Day 3 versus Day 2 embryo transfer after oocyte retrieval during an IVF or ICSI treatment cycle in infertile couples. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. The primary outcome measures were live birth rate and ongoing pregnancy rate. We included 15 studies. Fourteen studies reported data per woman (2894 women) and one study reported data per cycle (969 cycles). The quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach ranged from moderate quality to very low quality. The main reasons for downgrading evidence were poor methodological reporting, selective reporting, inconsistency and imprecision. Live birth per woman - Overall, there was no evidence of a difference in live birth rate between Day three and Day two embryo transfer (risk ratio (RR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89 to 1.23; three studies, n = 1200 women; I(2) = 63%; very low quality evidence). The data suggest that if 32% of women who underwent a Day two embryo transfer had a live birth, then between 28% to 39% of women undergoing a Day three embryo transfer would have a live birth. Ongoing pregnancy per woman - There was no evidence of a difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for ongoing pregnancy (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.12; six studies, n = 1740 women; I(2) = 52%; very low quality of evidence). The data suggest that if 33% of women undergoing a Day two embryo transfer had an ongoing pregnancy then between 28% to 37% of women undergoing a Day three embryo transfer would have an ongoing pregnancy. Clinical pregnancy per woman - There was no evidence of a difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for the chance of a clinical pregnancy (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.19; 12 studies, n = 2461, I(2) = 51%; very low quality evidence). The data suggest that if 39% of women undergoing Day two embryo transfer had a clinical pregnancy, then between 38% to 46% of women undergoing a Day three embryo transfer would have a clinical pregnancy. Multiple pregnancy per woman - There was no evidence of a difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for the risk of a multiple pregnancy (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.44; eight studies, n = 1837; I(2) = 0%; moderate quality evidence). The data suggest that if 11% of women undergoing Day two embryo transfer had a multiple pregnancy, then between 9% to 15% of women undergoing a Day three embryo transfer would have a multiple pregnancy. Miscarriage rate per woman - There was no evidence of a difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for the risk of miscarriage (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.60; nine studies, n = 2153 women, I(2) = 26%; moderate quality evidence). The data suggest that if 6% of women undergoing Day two embryo transfer had a miscarriage, then between 5% to 10% of women undergoing a Day three embryo transfer would have a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy rate per woman - There was no evidence of a difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for the risk of ectopic pregnancy (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.29 to 3.40; six studies, n = 1531 women, I(2) = 0%; low quality evidence). The data suggest that if 0.7% of women undergoing Day two embryo transfer have an ectopic pregnancy, then between 0.2% to 2% of women undergoing Day three embryo transfer would have an ectopic pregnancy.Subgroup analysis for pregnancy outcomes did not identify any differential effect between IVF and ICSI.None of the included studies prespecified complication rate (e.g. OHSS), fetal abnormality or women's evaluation of the procedure as outcomes in their studies. Twelve of 15 studies contributed data that could be included in meta-analyses. The quality of the evidence ranged from moderate to very low. Only three of the 15 studies reported data for live birth, although the data for ongoing pregnancy and clinical pregnancy are consistent with the live birth data, suggesting no difference between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for these outcomes. There was no evidence of a difference identified between Day three and Day two embryo transfer for multiple pregnancy, miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy per woman randomised. No data were reported for complication rate, fetal abnormality or woman's evaluation of the procedure. The current evidence has not identified any evidence of differences in pregnancy outcomes between Day two and Day three embryo transfers. Any further studies comparing these timings of embryo transfer are unlikely to alter the findings and we suggest that this review no longer be updated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Unspecified 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Unspecified 6 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2018.
All research outputs
#2,038,830
of 12,177,594 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#3,802
of 8,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,816
of 329,617 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#63
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,177,594 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,225 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,617 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.