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Occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern along the California coast (2009–10) using passive sampling devices

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Pollution Bulletin, April 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

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Title
Occurrence of contaminants of emerging concern along the California coast (2009–10) using passive sampling devices
Published in
Marine Pollution Bulletin, April 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.04.022
Pubmed ID
Authors

David A. Alvarez, Keith A. Maruya, Nathan G. Dodder, Wenjian Lao, Edward T. Furlong, Kelly L. Smalling

Abstract

Three passive sampling devices (PSDs), polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS), polyethylene devices (PEDs), and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) samplers were used to sample a diverse set of chemicals in the coastal waters of San Francisco Bay and the Southern California Bight. Seventy one chemicals (including fragrances, phosphate flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, PAHs, PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides) were measured in at least 50% of the sites. The chemical profile from the San Francisco Bay sites was distinct from profiles from the sites in the Southern California Bight. This distinction was not due to a single compound or class, but by the relative abundances/concentrations of the chemicals. Comparing the PSDs to mussel (Mytilus spp.) tissues, a positive correlation exists for the 25 and 26 chemicals in common for the PEDs and SPME, respectively. Diphenhydramine was the only common chemical out of 40 analyzed in both POCIS and tissues detected at a common site.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Turkey 1 1%
France 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 93 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 27%
Researcher 21 21%
Student > Master 13 13%
Other 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 7 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 39%
Chemistry 21 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 18 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2013.
All research outputs
#10,711,311
of 12,078,939 outputs
Outputs from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#2,879
of 4,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,438
of 135,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#34
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,078,939 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,061 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.