↓ Skip to main content

A survey of health care needs of physicians

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A survey of health care needs of physicians
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1728-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Khalid Benkhadra, Jayanth Adusumalli, Tamim Rajjo, Philp T. Hagen, Zhen Wang, M. Hassan Murad

Abstract

The healthcare needs of physician are not well studied. We surveyed physicians attending a large primary care conference about their access and perceived barriers to receiving healthcare services. Response rate was 46 % (270/592). The majority were trained in family medicine. The age category of above 60 years was the most common (39 %) and 46 % were women. Important difficulty in accessing healthcare services was reported by 39 % of physicians and the majority (61 %) reported reverting to self-diagnosis and self-treatment. Female physicians reported more difficulties than male physicians (p < 0.001 for difficulty in securing access and p = 0.02 for self-diagnosis and treatment). The barriers cited were finding time for healthcare, concern about confidentiality, and lack of encouragement by employer. Respondents reported experiencing a career threatening illness themselves (20 %) or in a colleague (81 %). Forty-two percent experienced being concerned about a colleague being able to safely practice due to illness. Participants ranked substance abuse as the most common illnesses affecting a physician's ability to practice followed by psychiatric disorders, heart disease, neurological disorders and cancer. Physicians face important barriers to accessing healthcare services. Female physicians report worse access. The identified barriers are modifiable. This survey calls for efforts to improve physicians' health that require collaboration among physicians, employers and policymakers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Unspecified 4 27%
Psychology 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,432,477
of 12,372,105 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,739
of 4,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,379
of 309,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#89
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,105 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,065 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,105 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.