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Autism as a strongly genetic disorder: evidence from a British twin study

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Medicine, July 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
20 tweeters
patent
6 patents
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
1722 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
778 Mendeley
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Title
Autism as a strongly genetic disorder: evidence from a British twin study
Published in
Psychological Medicine, July 2009
DOI 10.1017/s0033291700028099
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Bailey, A. Le Couteur, I. Gottesman, P. Bolton, E. Simonoff, E. Yuzda, M. Rutter

Abstract

Two previous epidemiological studies of autistic twins suggested that autism was predominantly genetically determined, although the findings with regard to a broader phenotype of cognitive, and possibly social, abnormalities were contradictory. Obstetric and perinatal hazards were also invoked as environmentally determined aetiological factors. The first British twin sample has been re-examined and a second total population sample of autistic twins recruited. In the combined sample 60% of monozygotic (MZ) pairs were concordant for autism versus no dizygotic (DZ) pairs; 92% of MZ pairs were concordant for a broader spectrum of related cognitive or social abnormalities versus 10% of DZ pairs. The findings indicate that autism is under a high degree of genetic control and suggest the involvement of multiple genetic loci. Obstetric hazards usually appear to be consequences of genetically influenced abnormal development, rather than independent aetiological factors. Few new cases had possible medical aetiologies, refuting claims that recognized disorders are common aetiological influences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 778 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 2%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Spain 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
China 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 740 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 145 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 126 16%
Student > Master 107 14%
Researcher 105 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 54 7%
Other 119 15%
Unknown 122 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 145 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 142 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 105 13%
Neuroscience 83 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 55 7%
Other 91 12%
Unknown 157 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 61. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2020.
All research outputs
#376,991
of 16,027,623 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Medicine
#173
of 4,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,488
of 158,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Medicine
#4
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,027,623 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.