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Western Bats as a Reservoir of Novel Streptomyces Species with Antifungal Activity

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
Western Bats as a Reservoir of Novel Streptomyces Species with Antifungal Activity
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1128/aem.03057-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paris S. Hamm, Nicole A. Caimi, Diana E. Northup, Ernest W. Valdez, Debbie C. Buecher, Christopher A. Dunlap, David P. Labeda, Shiloh Lueschow, Andrea Porras-Alfaro

Abstract

At least two-thirds of commercial antibiotics today are derived from Actinobacteria, more specifically from the genus Streptomyces Antibiotic resistance and new emerging diseases pose great challenges in the field of microbiology. Cave systems, in which Actinobacteria are ubiquitous and abundant, represent new opportunities for the discovery of novel bacteria species and the study of their interactions with emergent pathogens. White-nose syndrome is an invasive bat disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which has killed more than six million bats in the last seven years. In this study, we isolated naturally occurring Actinobacteria from WNS-free bats from five cave systems, and surface locations in the vicinity, in New Mexico and Arizona, USA. We sequenced the 16S rRNA region and tested 632 isolates from 12 different bat species using a bi-layer plate method to evaluate antifungal activity. Thirty-six Actinobacteria inhibited or stopped the growth of P. destructans with 32 (88.9%) belonging to the genus Streptomyces Isolates in the genera Rhodococcus, Streptosporangium, Luteipulveratus, and Nocardiopsis also showed inhibition. Twenty-five of the isolates with antifungal activity against P. destructans represent 15 novel Streptomyces spp. based on multi-locus sequence analysis. Our results suggest that bats in western North America caves possess novel bacterial microbiota with the potential to inhibit P. destructans IMPORTANCE: This study reports the largest collection of Actinobacteria from bats with activity against Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungal causative agent of white-nose syndrome. Using multi-gene analysis, we discovered 15 potential novel species. This research demonstrates bats and caves may serve as a rich reservoir for novel Streptomyces species with antimicrobial bioactive compounds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 6%
Unknown 46 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 29%
Researcher 8 16%
Other 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 33%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#482,034
of 14,512,120 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#208
of 10,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,063
of 376,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#9
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,512,120 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,615 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 376,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.