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Predicting the Timing and Magnitude of Tropical Mosquito Population Peaks for Maximizing Control Efficiency

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, February 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Predicting the Timing and Magnitude of Tropical Mosquito Population Peaks for Maximizing Control Efficiency
Published in
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, February 2009
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000385
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guo-Jing Yang, Barry W. Brook, Corey J. A. Bradshaw

Abstract

The transmission of mosquito-borne diseases is strongly linked to the abundance of the host vector. Identifying the environmental and biological precursors which herald the onset of peaks in mosquito abundance would give health and land-use managers the capacity to predict the timing and distribution of the most efficient and cost-effective mosquito control. We analysed a 15-year time series of monthly abundance of Aedes vigilax, a tropical mosquito species from northern Australia, to determine periodicity and drivers of population peaks (high-density outbreaks). Two sets of density-dependent models were used to examine the correlation between mosquito abundance peaks and the environmental drivers of peaks or troughs (low-density periods). The seasonal peaks of reproduction (r) and abundance (N(peak)) occur at the beginning of September and early November, respectively. The combination of low mosquito abundance and a low frequency of a high tide exceeding 7 m in the previous low-abundance (trough) period were the most parsimonious predictors of a peak's magnitude, with this model explaining over 50% of the deviance in N(peak). Model weights, estimated using AIC(c), were also relatively high for those including monthly maximum tide height, monthly accumulated tide height or total rainfall per month in the trough, with high values in the trough correlating negatively with the onset of a high-abundance peak. These findings illustrate that basic environmental monitoring data can be coupled with relatively simple density feedback models to predict the timing and magnitude of mosquito abundance peaks. Decision-makers can use these methods to determine optimal levels of control (i.e., least-cost measures yielding the largest decline in mosquito abundance) and so reduce the risk of disease outbreaks in human populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Chile 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
French Polynesia 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Slovakia 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 67 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 16%
Student > Master 9 12%
Other 7 9%
Professor 7 9%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 44%
Environmental Science 10 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 9%
Engineering 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,699,616
of 16,029,194 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#1,485
of 7,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,754
of 158,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#23
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,029,194 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,003 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.