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Cruciferous Vegetables: Dietary Phytochemicals for Cancer Prevention

Overview of attention for article published in Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 3,085)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
6 YouTube creators

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
171 Mendeley
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Title
Cruciferous Vegetables: Dietary Phytochemicals for Cancer Prevention
Published in
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, March 2013
DOI 10.7314/apjcp.2013.14.3.1565
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmad Faizal Abdull Razis, Noramaliza Mohd Noor

Abstract

Relationships between diet and health have attracted attention for centuries; but links between diet and cancer have been a focus only in recent decades. The consumption of diet-containing carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic amines is most closely correlated with increasing cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that consumption of dietary phytochemicals found in vegetables and fruit can decrease cancer incidence. Among the various vegetables, broccoli and other cruciferous species appear most closely associated with reduced cancer risk in organs such as the colorectum, lung, prostate and breast. The protecting effects against cancer risk have been attributed, at least partly, due to their comparatively high amounts of glucosinolates, which differentiate them from other vegetables. Glucosinolates, a class of sulphur- containing glycosides, present at substantial amounts in cruciferous vegetables, and their breakdown products such as the isothiocyanates, are believed to be responsible for their health benefits. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the chemopreventive effect of these compounds are likely to be manifold, possibly concerning very complex interactions, and thus difficult to fully understand. Therefore, this article provides a brief overview about the mechanism of such compounds involved in modulation of carcinogen metabolising enzyme systems.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Croatia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 167 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 36 21%
Student > Master 31 18%
Researcher 14 8%
Student > Postgraduate 10 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 5%
Other 24 14%
Unknown 47 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 9%
Chemistry 9 5%
Other 19 11%
Unknown 53 31%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 119. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2024.
All research outputs
#359,712
of 25,867,969 outputs
Outputs from Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
#13
of 3,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,356
of 213,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
#2
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,867,969 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,085 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,500 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.