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The effects for PM2.5 exposure on non-small-cell lung cancer induced motility and proliferation

Overview of attention for article published in SpringerPlus, January 2016
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Citations

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Title
The effects for PM2.5 exposure on non-small-cell lung cancer induced motility and proliferation
Published in
SpringerPlus, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40064-016-3734-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yang, Biao, Chen, Dongmei, Zhao, Hui, Xiao, Chunling

Abstract

Increasing urbanization and associated air pollution, including elevated levels of particulate matter (PM), are strongly correlated with the development of various respiratory diseases. In particular, PM2.5 has been implicated in promoting lung cancer initiation, growth and progression. Cell migration and proliferation are crucial for the progression of cancer. However, the molecular signatures and biological networks representing the distinct and shared features of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after PM2.5 exposure are unknown. Functional assays demonstrated higher proliferation, migration and invasion of cancer cells stimulated with PM2.5. To investigate the complicated mechanisms, we performed global transcriptome profiling of the A549 cell line. Particularly, transcriptome sequencing revealed invasive characteristics reminiscent of cancer cells. By comparing the transcriptomes, we identified distinct molecular signatures and cellular processes defining the invasive and proliferative properties of PM2.5-exposed cells, respectively. Interestingly, under the PM2.5-stimulated condition, the A549 and H1299 cells strengthened obviously properties in motility and proliferation. Based on the network model reconstructing the shared protein-protein interactions, we selected the two most up-regulated genes, interleukin-1β (IL1β) and matrix metalloprotease 1 (MMP1), as key regulators responsible for the effects of PM2.5 exposure. Notably, IL1β and MMP1 expression was elevated in independent assays, which was further enhanced by PM2.5. Taken together, our systems approach to investigating PM2.5 exposure provides a basis to identify key regulators responsible for the pathological features of NSCLC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Other 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 20%
Environmental Science 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Chemistry 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 6 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2016.
All research outputs
#7,639,061
of 8,806,948 outputs
Outputs from SpringerPlus
#1,294
of 1,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#245,181
of 300,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from SpringerPlus
#45
of 50 outputs
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