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Simultaneous Top-down Modulation of the Primary Somatosensory Cortex and Thalamic Nuclei during Active Tactile Discrimination

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroscience, February 2013
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215 Mendeley
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Title
Simultaneous Top-down Modulation of the Primary Somatosensory Cortex and Thalamic Nuclei during Active Tactile Discrimination
Published in
Journal of Neuroscience, February 2013
DOI 10.1523/jneurosci.1659-12.2013
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Pais-Vieira, M. A. Lebedev, M. C. Wiest, M. A. L. Nicolelis

Abstract

The rat somatosensory system contains multiple thalamocortical loops (TCLs) that altogether process, in fundamentally different ways, tactile stimuli delivered passively or actively sampled. To elucidate potential top-down mechanisms that govern TCL processing in awake, behaving animals, we simultaneously recorded neuronal ensemble activity across multiple cortical and thalamic areas while rats performed an active aperture discrimination task. Single neurons located in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), the ventroposterior medial, and the posterior medial thalamic nuclei of the trigeminal somatosensory pathways exhibited prominent anticipatory firing modulations before the whiskers touching the aperture edges. This cortical and thalamic anticipatory firing could not be explained by whisker movements or whisker stimulation, because neither trigeminal ganglion sensory-evoked responses nor EMG activity were detected during the same period. Both thalamic and S1 anticipatory activity were predictive of the animal's discrimination accuracy. Inactivation of the primary motor cortex (M1) with muscimol affected anticipatory patterns in S1 and the thalamus, and impaired the ability to predict the animal's performance accuracy based on thalamocortical anticipatory activity. These findings suggest that neural processing in TCLs is launched in anticipation of whisker contact with objects, depends on top-down effects generated in part by M1 activity, and cannot be explained by the classical feedforward model of the rat trigeminal system.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 4%
Germany 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 193 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 63 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 28%
Student > Master 37 17%
Professor 10 5%
Student > Postgraduate 7 3%
Other 24 11%
Unknown 13 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 95 44%
Neuroscience 47 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 9%
Psychology 15 7%
Engineering 10 5%
Other 12 6%
Unknown 16 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2013.
All research outputs
#11,401,373
of 17,583,573 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroscience
#16,469
of 21,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,666
of 164,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroscience
#255
of 353 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,583,573 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 21,091 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,971 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 353 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.