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The Human Gut Chip “HuGChip”, an Explorative Phylogenetic Microarray for Determining Gut Microbiome Diversity at Family Level

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, May 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

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4 patents

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Title
The Human Gut Chip “HuGChip”, an Explorative Phylogenetic Microarray for Determining Gut Microbiome Diversity at Family Level
Published in
PLOS ONE, May 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0062544
Pubmed ID
Authors

William Tottey, Jeremie Denonfoux, Faouzi Jaziri, Nicolas Parisot, Mohiedine Missaoui, David Hill, Guillaume Borrel, Eric Peyretaillade, Monique Alric, Hugh M. B. Harris, Ian B. Jeffery, Marcus J. Claesson, Paul W. O'Toole, Pierre Peyret, Jean-François Brugère

Abstract

Evaluating the composition of the human gut microbiota greatly facilitates studies on its role in human pathophysiology, and is heavily reliant on culture-independent molecular methods. A microarray designated the Human Gut Chip (HuGChip) was developed to analyze and compare human gut microbiota samples. The PhylArray software was used to design specific and sensitive probes. The DNA chip was composed of 4,441 probes (2,442 specific and 1,919 explorative probes) targeting 66 bacterial families. A mock community composed of 16S rRNA gene sequences from intestinal species was used to define the threshold criteria to be used to analyze complex samples. This was then experimentally verified with three human faecal samples and results were compared (i) with pyrosequencing of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene, (ii) metagenomic data, and (iii) qPCR analysis of three phyla. When compared at both the phylum and the family level, high Pearson's correlation coefficients were obtained between data from all methods. The HuGChip development and validation showed that it is not only able to assess the known human gut microbiota but could also detect unknown species with the explorative probes to reveal the large number of bacterial sequences not yet described in the human gut microbiota, overcoming the main inconvenience encountered when developing microarrays.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 106 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 18%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Other 7 6%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Engineering 8 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 5%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 16 15%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2021.
All research outputs
#2,805,019
of 22,711,242 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#36,344
of 193,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,043
of 196,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#863
of 4,968 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,711,242 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 193,913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,382 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,968 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.