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Umbilical artery catheters in the newborn: effects of heparin

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 1999
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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Title
Umbilical artery catheters in the newborn: effects of heparin
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, January 1999
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000507
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keith J Barrington

Abstract

This section is under preparation and will be included in the next issue. To determine whether the use of heparin in fluids infused through an umbilical arterial catheter in newborn infants influences the frequency of clinical ischemic events, catheter occlusion, aortic thrombosis, intraventricular hemorrhage, hypertension, death, or the duration of catheter usability. Randomized and quasi randomized controlled trials of umbilical catheterization use were obtained from the following sources: 1. Effective Care of the Newborn Infant, edited by JC Sinclair and MB Bracken. 2. Medline Search using Melvyl Medline Plus and the keyword headings 'Umbilic#', 'Catheter#' and subject heading 'Infant, Newborn' 3. Search of personal data files Randomized trials in newborn infants of any birthweight or gestation. Comparison of heparinised to non heparinised infusion fluids, including comparison of heparin in the infusate to heparin just in the flush solution. Clinically important end points such as catheter occlusion or aortic thrombosis. There were five randomized controlled trials retrieved. All gave details of the incidence of catheter occlusion. Two also reported the incidence of aortic thrombosis. The intervention was reasonably consistent: heparin in the infusate at a concentration of 1 unit/mL was investigated in all trials except one which used a concentration of 0.25 units/mL. Studies generally included both term and preterm infants. Heparinization of the infusate decreases the incidence of catheter occlusion but does not affect the frequency of aortic thrombosis. Heparinization of the flush solution is not an adequate alternative. There does not appear to be an effect on frequency of intraventricular hemorrhage, death or clinical ischemic phenomena. Heparinization of the fluid infused through an umbilical arterial catheter decreases the likelihood of umbilical arterial catheters occluding. The lowest concentration tested so far (0.25 units/mL) has been shown to be effective. Heparinization of flushes without heparinizing the infusate is ineffective. The frequency of aortic thrombosis has not been shown to be affected; however, the confidence intervals for this effect are very wide. The frequency of intraventricular hemorrhage has not been shown to be affected by heparinization of the infusate, but again the confidence intervals are very wide and even a major increase in the incidence of grade 3 and 4 intraventricular hemorrhage would not have been detected.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Unknown 41 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 18%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 10 23%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Linguistics 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2016.
All research outputs
#2,922,836
of 12,527,093 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,881
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,276
of 363,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#81
of 136 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,093 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,397 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 136 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.