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Fusobacterium infection facilitates the development of endometriosis through the phenotypic transition of endometrial fibroblasts

Overview of attention for article published in Science Translational Medicine, June 2023
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 5,478)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

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Title
Fusobacterium infection facilitates the development of endometriosis through the phenotypic transition of endometrial fibroblasts
Published in
Science Translational Medicine, June 2023
DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.add1531
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayako Muraoka, Miho Suzuki, Tomonari Hamaguchi, Shinya Watanabe, Kenta Iijima, Yoshiteru Murofushi, Keiko Shinjo, Satoko Osuka, Yumi Hariyama, Mikako Ito, Kinji Ohno, Tohru Kiyono, Satoru Kyo, Akira Iwase, Fumitaka Kikkawa, Hiroaki Kajiyama, Yutaka Kondo

Abstract

Retrograde menstruation is a widely accepted cause of endometriosis. However, not all women who experience retrograde menstruation develop endometriosis, and the mechanisms underlying these observations are not yet understood. Here, we demonstrated a pathogenic role of Fusobacterium in the formation of ovarian endometriosis. In a cohort of women, 64% of patients with endometriosis but <10% of controls were found to have Fusobacterium infiltration in the endometrium. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that activated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling resulting from Fusobacterium infection of endometrial cells led to the transition from quiescent fibroblasts to transgelin (TAGLN)-positive myofibroblasts, which gained the ability to proliferate, adhere, and migrate in vitro. Fusobacterium inoculation in a syngeneic mouse model of endometriosis resulted in a marked increase in TAGLN-positive myofibroblasts and increased number and weight of endometriotic lesions. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment largely prevented establishment of endometriosis and reduced the number and weight of established endometriotic lesions in the mouse model. Our data support a mechanism for the pathogenesis of endometriosis via Fusobacterium infection and suggest that eradication of this bacterium could be an approach to treat endometriosis.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 545 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Researcher 12 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 33 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 5%
Engineering 3 4%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 37 47%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1331. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2024.
All research outputs
#9,955
of 25,779,988 outputs
Outputs from Science Translational Medicine
#28
of 5,478 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#314
of 385,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Translational Medicine
#2
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,779,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,478 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 87.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.